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written about johnson. there's been lots of books written about civil rights. but no one had taken johnson and king together, put them under a microscope, and watched what they did day-by-day through an incredible period of history. a two-year period, from kennedy's assassination, to the passage of the voting rights act, when numerous of our most distinguished historians say, more legislation of huge impact on our society took place in that brief period than any other period in american history. you can stack it up along roosevelt's first 100 days. teddy roosevelt's good times welcomes andrew jackson. none of them excel what got accomplished in that brief period of time, and i think there's a joy and pleasure in reading about it, but i think we still have things to learn. so, anyway, i thought if i took king and johnson together and used them, their relationship, their agreements, their disagreements, i would have slightly new prism to be able to look at why all this stuff happened in that period of time. there were many, many, many factors. when i talk with people, some will say, well, it
i was honored to be among three civil rights leaders that i was invited with the head of the naacp and urban league, labor leaders from three organizations, showing that it is not a struggle that has yet won. we must continue to fight. it took the dr. kings, the rosa parks, to make it possible for us to have an open america. it took those that fought for gender equality and gay and l z lesbian rights and labor rights to open up america, it takes those of us now to continue to fight. we have gone through a turbulent time, we've gone through turbulent history. but we've not arrived yet. when you fly, you don't get off the plane when you get out of turbulence, you get off once you've reached your destination. until we get to the destination of this country, this nation living up to its creed, it will not be time for us to dislodge those that do what is necessary to keep this nation moving forward, both in office and those that are out of office and in the streets of this nation raising issues. that's what king day is about. that's what the victory of b arksz barack obama is a victory
on the civil rights agenda with access to the white house and for congress, all of that was contingent not taking a stand on vietnam. >> host: he was very upset on the stands he took because he felt weak handled civil rights and voting rights over and now you are going to go against me as i am up for the reelection you are going to go against me on the vietnam war. >> guest: now will understand what courage it took to take the stand she did, and i understand more about why she hesitated coretta didn't hesitate. she was involved in the entire war movement but she wasn't a public figure so she could send her to a centrally speak for him. >> host: and again history proves dr. king right. >> guest: this is one of the ways in which i think that he is a visionary. i think that he understood the connection between the anticolonial movements that were going on around the world, and understood how the cold war had prevented us from seeing that we were on the wrong side, that because the communist movement had identified itself with anticolonialism many of these nationalists wanted to have the a
news coverage of the civil-rights movement, featured jack quite prominently. first of all, i want to thank the carter library and museum for hosting this one and for cosponsoring it and also the emory university libraries, particularly the manuscript archives and rare books librarian which houses and in the papers and the wisdom of a great number of seven journalists. white, african-american, all sorts -- we are so pleased that five of those opulence a prizewinners'. the latest among them is jack nelson. barbara was so generous and has made jackson papers our position now. there is a rich, rich history, and ensure it -- encourage everyone to take a look. we are here to celebrate the life and more, the papers of jack nelson with some people who knew him extremely well. jack was a man of enormous influence in consequence in the nation. the story of jack nelson, for those who don't know, the story of news reporting and the latter half of the 20th century. if you look at this career starting off -- he was born in telling the of just across the state line to moves as a child to bil
his journey from teenage civil rights act to this present at the 1963 march on washington to editor of the attacking juniors papers. he includes encounters many leaders and organizers in the civil rights movement including ella baker, stokely carmichael and the king family. it's about an hour. >> thanks for joining man out her words. >> your boat, "martin's dream" is then no more an history book. in the book you talk about your personal journey and your very candid about your life. you also cover new insight as an historian to the life and legacy of dr. mart luther king junior. what prompted you to read the book this way? >> i wanted to write some thing to mark its 50th anniversary in business 50 years of my life, of king's legacy and his life coincided with my coming of age. so part of it was to do those two tasks. i felt i had connect it to the king legacy and yet i felt there was something about my life that needed to be told in order to understand how king impacted me and how i got involved in this amazing journey of editing king's papers. >> well, it's an excellent read. you an
of the modern state of our lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans tender civil rights movement. stone wall is the stonewall is really the way this movement kicked off. host: richard, connecticut, independent line. caller: i do not understand why you don't have someone from the opposition to this gentleman on the show, because it is is somewhat controversial subject and you have one view. that is very obvious to anyone watching the show. a second point is that, internationally, people like this gentleman who have support in the united states -- in many countries against the nets is, if you got now, ukraine, russia, hungary, dozens and dozens of nations are looking at the united states as an evil mention because tunnel men like this person -- gentleman like this person, " have lots of money and have more money than average americans, are going into these nations and promoting the homosexual lifestyle. in russia, they had a riot and had to shut down our professed homosexual demonstration in -- shut down a pro-homosexual demonstration because, was funded b -- was funded by american groups. and
and stonewall. it will be repeated over and over again as part of the traditions of american rights and civil rights. >> that was really something. to hear him smeng stonewall in the first statements, certainly for gay and lesbian americans, that was a stunning leap forward. >> gigantic. he connected it all to the patriots of 1776. that we keep widening in our democracy. he made those places almost like battlefield spots. like oxford, mississippi or normandy or iwo jima. >> i was going to say time and again when presidents have come here, when they've cited heroes, they've been military heroes. to talk about seneca falls and selma is more about an inclusive america with an emphasis on the quality of opportunity. not upon liberty. a republican would have traditionally given a speech about liberty. >> stonewall was the group of people most marginalized in society and the most shunned who weren't even allowed to congregate in a bar at the same time without getting harassed and arrested. >> stonewall from 1969 has been considered almost alternate left history for a while. now gay studies has come
they thought at the time, the people in the civil rights movement fought. was the police making of the intrusions face of the fbi as their friends which relatively speaking the fbi agents on the ground. it's a complex period. you have a hostile political part of the fbi and a relatively friendly, crimefighting part of the fbi coexisting at a time when the movement is under constant danger, the various scattered movement throughout the south. c-span: "parting the waters," your first book was published in what your? >> guest: at the end of 1988. c-span: was the per code that you discussed? >> guest: 54 to 63. the year the brown decision, the year the supreme court unanimously said in effect their racial segregation and subornation is in conflict with the american constitution, kind of reading the challenge of the civil war period about slavery being in conflict with promise of equal citizenship. though that's 54, i'm going to 68 when that movement, built on that premise, largely dissolved. and it's the same year dr. king was killed. c-span: i have a better copy of "parting the wat
it not change with things like civil rights things like gay rights. what is it about this issue? >> reporter: well, one of the hard things since it's legalized, most people especially younger women have come to expect this is their right, they have the right to this care. we're not out there demanding something new but we're encouraging to keep the right we already have. so it's not quite the same for a struggle in guy rights or something new. for this generation it's maintain what we already have so you're not going to see as much enthusiasm. now people are seeing what can happen if you take for grants the right to have access to an abortion care and people are starting to push back. i'm optimistic about how we feel about this going forward. >> michael: that's a great answer to the question. that's exactly right. it's keeping it right rather than trying to get a new right. that makes a difference. it's also a big difference to keep news coverage of this alive all the time. thank you kate sheppard from mother jones magazine for coming on "the war room"." we have a progressive from a red stat
, the city of clinton was in the midst of a civil rights struggle. after what and restored a black neighborhood was firebombed, police officers and firefighters arrived to extinguish the flames but came under gunfire. an african-american teen was killed by police that night, a white man was shot and killed the next day. the national guard moved in. nine black men and one white woman were rounded up, hustled off to jail for their alleged involvement. the young defendants, the majority just high school age, were collectively sentenced to a total of more than 280 years in prison. rev. ben chavis served more than five years in prison. shortly after he appeared on "democracy now!" last month, governor perdue issued pardons of innocence for the wilmington 10. the move came after newly surfaced documents revealed the prosecutor in the case made racially biased notes next to potential jurors, writing comments like "kkk good." i asked rev. chavis last night what it felt like to be attending president of the inauguration on dr. martin luther king day, after finally being pardoned. >> this is
grew up to be a civil rights lawyer. he worked for the independent congratulation of schools. in 1977, he became the first african-american mayor of richmond, virginia. he has served in the virginia state senate since 1992. only two active senators have served in that chamber longer than he has. senator marsh wanted to see the inauguration of this president on martin luther king day. mr. marsh is 79 years old. it seems unlikely that there will be an inauguration quite like this again any time soon. so for a day, henry marsh left behind the virginia state senate. the virginia state senate i should tell you stands at an even 20-20. it is equally divided, half republicans and half democrats. 20 on one side, 20 on the other. and while senator marsh was away on this within day while he was at the inauguration, the republicans in the senate decided to do this. surprise! we're going to redraw virginia's state senate districts with no warning, while you were out, we're going to do this. ta-da. the associated press says, quote, state senate republicans have muscled a surreptitious redraft of v
, making mentions of past civil rights struggles on that martin luther king day, seneca falls, selma, stonewall and laying out his vision for the future, advancing gay rights, tolerance toward illegal immigrants, social welfare programs and stopping climate change. dan loathian was there watching it all with us. dan, friend and foe alike have been calling this a muscular speech. >> reporter: it really was according to those who got a chance to witness the speech. the president delivering his remarks in a much more different climate than he faced four years ago when you had two wars, there was the economic crisis. this time, the president laid out a progressive agenda for the next four years. and so it began, the second inaugural ceremony of president obama, part campaign speech, part lecture, a confident president obama appeared comfortable in his skin. >> my fellow americans, we're made for this moment and we'll seize it as long as we seize it together. we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal >> our journey is not complete unti
several pivotal civil rights moments, he linked them together. dan yoth lothian has the highlights. >> reporter: this is a speech we're told the president had been working on since mid december, and he delivered it rather in a much different climate than he had four years ago, and he was dealing with two wars and also a financial crisis this time, the president used history to help define a progressive agenda for the next four years. >> please raise your right hand. >> reporter: and so it began. the second inaugural ceremony of president barack obama. part campaign speech, part pragmatic lecture, a confident mr. obama appeared comfortable in his presidential skin. >> my fellow americans, we are made for this moment and he will shall seize it together. >> reporter: the speech was rooted in history and fittingly on this holiday, reverend martin luther king jr.'s dream. >> we hold these truths to be self-evident. that all men are created equal. >> the past made modern with first-time references to climate change, immigration reform and sexual equality. >> our journey is not complete u
become the largest and most important civil rights protest in the world. [applause] please join me in welcoming the new president of the march for life, jeanne monahan. [applause] >> thank you. is anybody cold out there? [laughter] it is a little chilly, right? is ok. we are here for a pretty important cause, right? [applause]i can't. . hear you. [applause] today marks a somber moment in our country's history. we remember that 55 million americans have died as a result of legalized abortion in the last four decades. 55 million. this makes up about a fix of our current adulation in the united states of america. even the center for disease control and prevention reported that about one in five people are not allowed to live annually in the united states because of abortion. abortion truly is the human rights abuse of today. [applause] and abortion is not good for women. experience, science, and research continue to show what common sense already tells us. abortion takes the life of a baby and wounds its mother and father. it is a somber moment. and yet, i believe that we are seeing s
freedom. >> cenk: he connected it to the civil rights and women's rights m. that was a moment today and one you should soak in. there were moments that i thought were--let's just put it this way ironic. >> obama: this generation of americans has been tested by crises that test our resolve and prove our resilience. the decade of war is just ending. >> cenk: only if it were so. there was recently a statement put out that basically the war on terror will continue indefinitely at least for another ten years but probably much longer than that, and by the way we had another drone strike in yemen today as president obama was saying that the war is coming to an end interesting. and then here is the issue of politics and the central theme of the campaign. remember how paul ryan and mitt romney talked about the takers? well the president addressed that. >> obama: we recognize that no matter how responsibly we live our lives any one of us at any time may face a job loss or a sudden illness or a home swept away in a terrible storm. the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medi
on civil rights, but we can be right -- we can be first on human rights. instead of being laughed, we want to be first at something, and we believe being first ending abortion is a good thing. >> 3 hours drive from jackson, you have reached the mississippi delta. in one of the poorest parts of america, choosing to have an abortion is not an option for many women. they cannot afford to pay for the procedure. >> she is 13 years old. last month, she gave birth to her daughter. >> it is hard to go to school. i'm very sleepy. >> [indiscernible] >> gin at ground level has been working with pregnant teenagers in the delta and for 17 years. she is worried that the jackson clinic closes, more of these weylandt will have an unwanted pregnancies. -- more of these women will have unwanted pregnancies. >> [indiscernible] >> hsu became a mother two years ago when she had her daughter. now out of work, she is struggling with her decision not to become a mother again. >> i know this is something i have to do. i have to do this for me. >> bbc news, mississippi. >> the restriction of abortion rights 40 year
the grounder work and test the stage. then we can be last on civil rights but first on human rights. we believe being -- >> emma anderson chose do become a mother two years ago when she had her daughter. now out of work, she is struggling with her decision not to become a mother again. >> i'm really undecided about how i feel on it. but i know it's something i have to do. i have to do what's best for me at this point. >> "bbc world news", mississippi. >> a lot to think about this. plenty more on our top story, the election in israel. but stay with us here on "bbc world news." >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. decisions. we offer expertise and tailored
don't think i've seen a president do for civil rights leaders and later on had a private reception at the white house. >> how was his mood? >> very upbeat and hopeful. i think his speech was about him setting a tone for where he saw the rest of the century going. i don't think it was about four years for him. he's giving a vision. he thinks in terms, when he talks to us, about kennedy talking about the new frontier or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his vision of "i had a cream." >> and what you said in the white house was illuminating. >> while you're drinking, everything i said was illuminating. >> amen. don't you wish that people in the pews could be drinking on those days? even your worst sermon would sound good. >> you described the president as relieved. i t
honoring their achievements as well. there's a strong civil rights theme running through this parade. >> as there should be. >> as there should be. it is worth taking one last look at that on this inauguration day. >> it's a lot of history right there. a ton of history as we're watching what's going on. we'll take another quick break, resume our special coverage right here in "the situation room." [ female announcer ] what if the next big thing, isn't a thing at all? it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. cisco. tomorrow starts here. to the best vacation sp(all) the gulf! cisco. it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your mississippi outdoors. i vote for your florida beaches, dawn. bill, this louis
permitted to serve in combat roles and what's next for the u.s. military in term of equal rights and civil rights. the biggest issue is what role the military will have in defending the country at a time when our enemies are fragmented everywhere and it requires very well-educated people and i think the next big thing is in my view is universal service. we're not going to be able to defend the country of ten million people and we're an extremely small force and i don't care what the technology. i believe in universal service. >> a la israel or -- >> oh, yeah. it's going to require some logistical changes and it will require a great deal of leadership, but if you have a situation where you have more people in new york city than you had at pearl harbor and you have an all-volunteer force you're outsourcing our defense for a small number of brave young men and women. that's the next big equal opportunity. >> that's fascinating. kayla, very quickly. you're a published author now and an outspoken advocate. i've got to ask you, political future. are you thinking of running for something, maybe?
. that he also spoke up boldly for equality, human rights, civil rights for all americans. i remember he said, and you may recall, too, mr. speaker, he said, he said, we will never forget, you know, stonewall, cynical falls and selma. these are three iconic moments in civil rights history when he talked about the women's right movement, gay rights movement and african-american movements for civilritis. but they ale added up to one thing which is that an american is an american is an american, doesn't matter what your color is, what your sex is, who you love and want to be with, what matters are that you are an american and entitled to the full protection of the law in these united states. i think it was very important for him to do so. it represented an evolutionary moment in american mystery that a president, being nag rated into his second term, -- being inaugurated into his second term, would stand up and say civil and human rights for all people. i thought it was a great moment and found myself cheering even though i hadn't planned on doing so. but he didn't stop there. he specifical
in his inaugural, while talking about the struggle for civil rights. >> for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. >> reporter: the president insisting we address climate change, and on immigration, arguing we should welcome striving immigrants. >> until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our work force, rather than expelled from our country. >> reporter: were there powerful performances, kelly clarkson's stirring rendition of "my country tis of thee." ♪ to thee we sing >> reporter: beyonce returning four years later, this time, to sing the national anthem. ♪ and the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ >> reporter: and as the president made his exit up those steps, a pause. turning around to take in his final inaugural moment. one more time. a microphone picking up what he said. >> i want to take a look one more time. i'm not going to see this again. >> reporter: and as the first couple made their way back to the white house,
on the same day the nation pauses to remember civil rights legend and icon dr. martin luther king jr.. two men, two very different dreams forever linked. it is monday january 21st inauguration day and good morning. thank you for joining fox 5 special coverage. i'm allison seymour. >> i'm tony perkins. we are broadcasting from our temporary fox 5 studios high atop the canadian embassy. it's a beautiful building and a beautiful view. we are blocks from where all the accident gets underway. we will bring it all to you live all morning long as we mentioned earlier. this is president obama's 4th oath of office. he took his third yesterday. we'll show you a little bit of that. >> chief justice john roberts administered the oath. the president has two swearing in ceremonies because inauguration day fell yesterday. he had two of the first time around because he and justice roberts flood their lines during the public ceremony. >> vice president joe biden was also sworn in yesterday morning just as he administered his oath at the naval observatory. >> today's oaths will take place just before the noon h
. >>> the controversial plan to limit the size of sugary drinks has hit an unexpected new roadblock. two mayor civil right groups have gone to stop it. jeff glor, good morning. >> good morning to you. not many were surprised to see them oppose it but some were surprised when the spanish deck calculation and the naacp. they said they're doing it not because of race but because of economic fairness. new york city mayor michael bloomberg's plan would but a limit to 16-understand drink in restaurants, sports games, street carts, and movie theaters. it results in $4.7 billion in annual health care costs. 60% of which is paid by the city. >> our administration refuses to stand on the sidelines while millions of our fellow new yorkers struggle with the health implications of being overweight or obese. >> reporter: but the naacp says the mayor's approach is not right. >> the mayor sometime decided that an issue that is important to him should be just a this way or no hazel dukes is the presid. >> the decision is -- >> people can say what they want to. we are on the side of fairness. >> the lawsuit contents the su
state senator henry marsh, a longtime civil rights lawyer, was away attending the president's inauguration. now, that's insulting enough. but it gets worse.
, daughter of the civil rights leader joins us today. your father's personal bible is used in the swearing in today, along with a bible that belongsed to abraham lincoln. tell me about your father's bible. >> that bible is at least 59 years of age, because in it are markings. such as 5-10-54. he was using this as a bible to meditate and pray and prepare himself for leadership in the church. very tattered. we did a little repairing on it, restoration, so it wouldn't fall apart when the president places his hand on it. >> that would be a bad thing to happen in the middle of the inauguration ceremony. i know you are preparing to speak at ebenezer church today, because, of course, what a great coincidence of timing, today we also celebrate your father's legacy as well, on the same day we inaugurate a president. what will you talk about? how do the two things intersect for you? >> first and foremost, the fact that the president is using daddy's bible is heart warming for me. my father was first and foremost a preacher, pastor, it reminds people of that. that is one of the things i will stress t
, they remember the fight and struggle led by martin luther king and other people during the civil rights era to break through america's history of racism, of segregation, of people being marginalized. king lead to a lot of what we know now as historic legislation, the civil rights act, the voting rights act, the fair housing act. so there is a legacy that king left the benefit it and created the conditions under which president obama could even be elected to you do not have the voting rights act, you do not have black elected officials did you do not have the black vote -- a voting turnout that ultimately becomes critical in the 1990's, 2000, and of course in 2008, even in 2012. there is a long legacy. president obama himself acknowledges that he stands on those shoulders. not just the shoulders of former presidents that he talks about, but also the civil rights leaders. so it is significant that this is being held on martin luther king's holiday. and, of course, he is the president that is there when the martin luther king memorial actually comes about and is put up here in washington, d.c.
to a women's right to vote, of course. selma, alabama, the city where civil rights demonstrators fought for voting rights for african-americans in the march of 1965 only to be met violently by armed state troopers in a day that has since been known as bloody sunday. and the stonewall inn, often thought of the birthplace of the lgbt rights after a gay bar was raided by police in 1969 and for days became the site of protests and riots. here is the president yesterday. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still just as it guided our forbearers through seneca falls and selma and stonewall, just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung, who left footprints along this great mall to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone. to hear a king proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on earth. >> the iconic nature of that speech, we americans love brands. we love iconic moments, whether it's the golden gate bridge or niagara falls or these things
, the issue of choice is, in fact, wrapped up with women's reproductive almost -- these are civil rights issues on a lot of levels. how is a transvaginal ultrasound not a violation of privacy. >> i think with michael, i would say to you, i have read what you say about this, i do believe that republican values are sort of -- have -- they've lost hold in the party in many ways, as a party of believing in individual rights, individual responsibilities, no government intrusion, except in this arena, and i think we can agree this is a deeply personal issue. it's one that should be made by women, their doctors, their families, and not by politicians. >> it becomes a little bit of a conflict when you argue for the right of individuals to make, you know, choices and then you start to limit those choices, which is the societial argument that you have. the question i have, to the point you just raised, alex, about how this generation as "the times" pointed out, are they diffusing the ultimate he message here, or conversation when they -- in the context of talking about reproductive routes or abort
civil rights groups is taking a stand in support of beverage companies. the new york chapter of the naacp is backing a lawsuit filed to try and stop the city. hazel dukes is the new york chapter president. >> it's not about race. >> reporter: it's about? >> economic disparity. and how the small business is being punished while we allow the big corporate people, again, have their own way. >> reporter: convenience stores like 7-eleven are exempt. the naacp, along with the hispanic federation, argue that small and minority-owned businesses will feel is a disproportionate impact. then, there's the obesity epidemic. non-hispanic blacks, according to the cdc, have the highest rates of obesity at 44%, followed by mexican americans at 39%. the naacp followed a legal brief in support of beverage companies, saying, to tackle the public health crisis of obesity, it's developed a holistic, educational program called project help. the funding for that project, according to the naacp's website, is the coca-cola foundation, the philanthropic arm of the company. duke says the new york chapte
fifteen percent or more. >>> now to a story about civil rights and soda. the naacp is fighting the ban on big sugary drinks in new york city. it is supposed to go into effect in march. now, restaurants and other venues won't be able to sell sugary drinks and cups larger than 16 ounces. all to combat new yorkers' weight problem as the mayor explained when the board of health approved the measure in september. >> nearly 60% of adult new yorkers are overweight or obese and each faces a greater risk of developing a host of diseases including type 2 diabetes, cancer, hypertension and heart disease and, of course, obesity doesn't just affect adults. among new york city kids, nearly 40% are overweight or obese. >> joining me now is hazel dukes, president of the naacp new york state conference. miss dukes, thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> listen, when we think about the great fights of the naacp, we think about civil rights, we think about voting rights, we think about desegregating schools. and now sugary drinks. your group joined with hispanic federation and filed a j
an unexpected new roadblock. two major civil rights groups have gone to court to stop it. jeff glor is here with the story. >> not many were surprised to see the american beverage association oppose this limit on sugary drinks but some were surprised when the hispanic federation and the naacp joined. the obesity epidemic is most acute in african-american and hispanic neighborhoods. the naacp told us they're doing this not because of race but because of economic fairness. new york city mayor michael bloomberg's plan approved by the board of health in september would put a 16 ounce limit on sugary drinks sold at restaurants, sports games, street carts and movie theaters. it's just one of his responses to the city's 24% obesity rate which result in $4.7 billion in annual health care cost 60% of which is paid by the city. >> our administration refuses to stand on the sidelines while millions of our fellow new yorkans struggle with the health implications of being overweight or obese. >> reporter: but the naacp says the mayor's approach is not right. >> the mayor sometimes
threats? and why is the country's largest civil rights organization fighting new york's efforts to crack down on supersized soft drinks? we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." american men and women already are fighting and dying together overseas. the defense secretary leon panetta said today it's time for the military to recognize that reality. so the pentagon has ended its long-time policy of barring women from combat. critics question whether women can handle the grueling, physical tasks that come with those roles. chris lawrence has been looking into this for us. what's the latest, wolf? >> when it comes to integrating women, forget about privacy concerns. sleeping in close quarters, separate bathrooms, never mind that. it's strength and stamina. with a stroke of his pen, defense secretary leon panetta altered the look of the american sword. >> not everyone is going to be able to be a combat soldier but everyone is entitled to a chance. >> panetta officially opened up over 200,000 combat jobs to wom
, in the speech the president also broke ground by promising to push for expanded civil rights for gays and lesbians. aside from his health care reform law, this could be the greatest legacy, the biggest legacy of his time in office. a case that is now before the supreme court could force the administration into making new federal policy on this front. it could force the administration to decide whether federal benefits will be extended to same-sex couples in the next year, wolf. >> so now that he's laid out very specifically -- i was surprised how specific he went yesterday in the inaugural address, his priorities for the second term, i assume in his state of the union address in february that he he will go into details with more specifics. is that what you're hearing? >> reporter: yes, wolf. i was not surprised that he laid out sign posts about where he wanted to make progress. what he wasn't going to do in this speech was get into detail. so where he laid out markers on these major issues, we will now hear much more policy detail in the state of the union and the white house is sayin
. when you take away people's civil rights or say no to them you're not with them. if you're in a country club of 100 white men and they start dying off, your base is dead. the republican party, michael is right. he tried to do that when he was the chairman. you have to expand your base. only way to do that is to get out of people's houses, to get out of their bed rooms. to leave them alone. and have basically a society which is fair and equitable. don't forget mitt romney talked about the 47%. that is not the way to go about it. they have to look for it. >> last thing you hear, michael. you and i have had these conversations your relationship with the rnc. republican and out there fighting for what you believe in do you see this as i mean for the first time in awhile maybe a good chance and maybe just the drumming in the election with the president winning re-election. do you think republicans are starting? are you seeing signs that maybe it's hopeful in your opinion they're starting to change some of those stances and things you pushed and fought for? this is a hopeful thing for a repub
-- we had desegregation in the military in 1948. the civil rights act was passed in 196. equal pay for men and women in decades. something the society still can't claim to have. this is not about set asides or quotas but saying we will open the field for those who are capable of filling it in. in no way does it endanger national security if you have people who are qualified to serve in those roles. >> do you think there were opportunities you missed out on because of a policy like this and other women, the opportunities missed out on whether pro-potion motions or advancement? give us an idea how much women have been missing out on. >> a young woman came through boot camp with me and she signed up literally to fight. she was assigned to be a baker in the mess hall. she cried her eyes out for days because she wasn't going to serve on the front lines. i met every physical, emotional and mental challenge to serve on the front line but i'm 4'11" and i need an ammo box to shoot out of the fox hole. i don't belong on the front line. but the women who do meet those standards, it ought to b
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